Research Blogging

February 24, 2008 in KABT News

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Research Blog Logo

The web gets better and better every day in the sense that important information is easier to organize, find, and categorize.  This web site is a small example.  Today’s biology teachers have an unprecedented access to original research.  It’s imperative that we take advantage of this in order to keep up with the developments in the field if we are to reflect the biology of today in our classrooms.  I’ve referenced folks at the ScienceBlogs web site a number of times, here on the KABT Bioblog.   ScienceBlogs is a great resource but while the science is generally good, you also have to wade through posts about religion, politics, technology and personal topics to get to the science most applicable for your teaching.  The science bloggers, themselves, recognized this problem not long ago and a new site was born–Research Blogging.  From their web site:

Research Blogging helps you locate and share academic blog posts about peer-reviewed research. Bloggers use our icon to identify their thoughtful posts about serious research, and those posts are collected here for easy reference.

Their web site serves as a clearing house that collects and identifies blog entries from many different blogs that are about specific peer-review ed research.  Look for this icon in the blog post:

Research blog icon

An even easier method is to scroll down the left hand column of the KABT Bioblog and you’ll find a new RSS feed that includes the titles and links of the 5 most recent posts on the Research Blogging site.   If you click on the title it will take you directly to the blog in question.  If you click on the Header it will take you to the Research Blogging site where you’ll find earlier listings and groups of topics to explore.

BW

1 response to Research Blogging

  1. Great resource Brad. Thanks for linking up. The new global genomics study and support for “out-of-Africa” was a great example of another critical tool in the scientific process, mining and analyzing existing data.

    Todd

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