Spring Swarm

An Animal Behavior Challenge!

Earlier this week, Jim, a previous neighbor of mine, called to inform me of an interesting “natural event” that was taking place in a shrub next to his driveway. 

Here is a video of that event up close.  He had been out performing yard work in the past days and was sure that these bees had shown up over a short period of time.

I an effort to find out what exactly was happening and what he could do, Jim called his mother, who called her neighbor (who happened to be a master gardener), who then contacted Jarrett Mullenbruch (pictured below) who happens to be a sculpter with an interest in ecology, and who is currently working on an installation that integrates live bees. 

Once Jarrett arrived, he proceeded to talk to us about his Deep Ecology Project and then collected the bees for his installation.   To view a pdf slideshow of the images that I took, click on the image above.  You can view a collection of videos documenting the collection of the bees below.

Thanks for letting me in on the experience Jarrett and Jim!

Now for the Behavioral Challenge…

  1. How many bees would you estimate are in this swarm?
  2. Can you explain why the bees are engaged in this behavior in the first place? 
  3. Why is a bee hanging around the container full of bees in the third video?

I imagine that students could generate numerous questions that would stimulate quality discussions of this interesting animal behavior…

Providing some interesting links to resources or websites that could help students uncover the details of this natural event would be welcome as well.

The Human Genome at Ten: Nature’s Special

 

This Nature special contains 26 separate resources categorized into editorials, reviews, perspectives, comments, books & arts, technology features, features, audio & video, careers, and elsewhere in Nature sections (at least nine of these are free access).  Comments from Eric Lander, Francis Collins, and Craig Venter are all included as well as many others. 

It would be interesting to compare the what these symbols of genomic science wrote for these competing publications.

There is even an iPad app for experiencing this special issue.  Whether or not you have an iPad you should really check out this complation of information on the genome.  It’s hard to believe its been 10 years.

Nature’s Evolutionary Gems

A pdf Resource for Teachers wishing to spread Awareness of Evolution by Natural Selection

darwinnatureimage1
www.nature.com/evolutiongems

In this celebratory year of the Birth of Charles Darwin and the publication of his On the Origin of Species, it is fitting that the January 1 issue of the journal Nature announces a document “for teachers and others wishing to spread awareness of evolution by natural selection.”  The document is accessible at the link above, which forwards one to a seventeen page pdf file

The document includes student-friendly “editorial introductions” to 15 papers that have been published in Nature during the past decade.  These papers were selected “to illustrate the breadth, depth and power of evolutionary thinking”, and cover natural selection from the perspectives of the Fossil Record, Habitats, and Molecular Processes.  The specific titles are given by clicking the more link at the end of this post. 

Each abstract is formatted to a single page, and is followed by a link to the orginal paper, links to additional resources (which may not be accessible), and a link to the website(s) of the author(s).  For those that don’t have a subscription to the journal, many of the links to abstracts of the original research papers provide access to the full text and a freely downloadable pdf .  Happy readings!

Nature, thanks for compiling this fitting and freely available educational resource!  It is a wonderful New Years Gift!

Continue reading “Nature’s Evolutionary Gems”